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Paste meaning

paste - 8 dictionary results

  1. 1. A soft composition, as of flour moistened with water or milk, or of earth moistened to the consistence of dough, as in making potter's ware.
  2. 2. Specifically, in cookery, a dough prepared for the crust of pies and the like; pastry dough.
  3. 3. A highly refractive vitreous composition, variously colored, used in making imitations of precious stones or gems. See Strass.
  4. 4. A soft confection made of the inspissated juice of fruit, licorice, or the like, with sugar, etc.
  5. 5. The mineral substance in which other minerals are imbedded.
  6. 6. To unite with paste; to fasten or join by means of paste.
  7. 7. A kind of cement made of flour and water, starch and water, or the like, - used for uniting paper or other substances, as in bookbinding, etc., - also used in calico printing as a vehicle for mordant or color.
  8. 8. Dough; viscous cement; artificial gems.

paste - examples of usage

  1. I now ascertained that the seed of the latter is also collected by the natives and made into a paste. - "Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia In Search of a Route from Sydney to the Gulf of Carpentaria (1848) by Lt. Col. Sir Thomas Livingstone Mitchell Kt. D.C.L. (1792-1855) Surveyor-General of New South Wales", Thomas Mitchell.
  2. Mr. Kinghorne now informed me that it was called by the natives " coolly," and that the gins gather it in great quantities, and pound the seeds between stones with water, forming a kind of paste or bread; thus was clearly explained the object of those heaps of this grass which we had formerly seen on the banks of the Darling. - "Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia In Search of a Route from Sydney to the Gulf of Carpentaria (1848) by Lt. Col. Sir Thomas Livingstone Mitchell Kt. D.C.L. (1792-1855) Surveyor-General of New South Wales", Thomas Mitchell.
  3. What happens is that all of it which has been reduced to a thin paste will slip unnoticed down your throat, and you may go on putting more food into your mouth, and chewing, and can eat a whole meal without ever performing the act of swallowing. - "The Book of Life: Vol. I Mind and Body; Vol. II Love and Society", Upton Sinclair.
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